Regulations

Reaction to the British Columbia court decision on the public health care monopoly

Montreal, July 15, 2022 – The British Columbia Court of Appeal issued a decision earlier today in the case pitting the Cambie Surgeries Corporation against the provincial government. Like the Chaoulli decision in Quebec, this case essentially turns on the freedom of choice of patients who want to be treated rapidly by health care entrepreneurs.

Canadian Softwood Lumber: A Costly Dispute for Consumers and Companies

The Canada-US softwood lumber dispute that has lasted some forty years is good for neither country, MEI researchers conclude in this publication. The drop in Canadian production has direct consequences on this country’s forestry industry, and is not offset by the increased production south of the border, which leads to a net loss in the volume of wood available in the American market. This artificially induced greater scarcity of wood leads to higher costs for consumers.

Tear down these walls, premiers!

As Canadians grapple with supply chain issues, inflationary pressures, and post-COVID or endemic-COVID recovery, we need to get serious about freeing up interprovincial trade once and for all.

Bill C-11, the Online Streaming Act, Gives Free Rein to the CRTC

On November 22 last year, the federal government introduced Bill C‑11, the Online Streaming Act, in the House of Commons. Its goal is to allow the CRTC to regulate online streaming services. The Netflixes and Disneys of the world, as well as platforms like Spotify and YouTube, are targeted by the bill. It will potentially cover almost all audio and audiovisual content accessible online in Canada. This MEI publication warns against the possible economic, cultural, and legal consequences of this bill.

Les données doivent suivre le patient

Le Québec a désespérément besoin de mettre en place un écosystème de santé numérique moderne et robuste. Cela favorisera la santé des patients d’aujourd’hui et encouragera l’innovation pour offrir de meilleurs soins demain.

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